Vaxxas and UQ to change the way we're vaccinated?

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desikitteh
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Vaxxas and UQ to change the way we're vaccinated?

Post by desikitteh » Mon Mar 16, 2015 2:10 pm

An exciting development out of the University of Queensland in Australia could turn the vaccination process on its head. The nanopatch, about the size of a postage stamp has the potential to replace needles and syringes.

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The vaccine is delivered by pressing the patch against the skin, where it is delivered to “key immune cells directly below the skin”.

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The patch has several advantages over the traditional jab, including being painless and significantly less stressful for the many people who are afraid of needles.

The nanopatch would also be able to be administered by just about anyone, allowing for wider access to vaccines. Even allowing for vaccines to be delivered directly to those at risk during times of epidemic. This would mean that they may not have to leave their homes and risk exposure.

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This could also be to the advantage to people who are housebound due to illness, age or disability, where a carer or support worker could administer the dosage in the home.

Direct delivery would allow use of a significantly lower dose, the researchers suggesting as little as 1% of the current dose for influenza. This would make it far more efficient and significantly cheaper with some sources quoting less than a dollar per dose.

There is also some possibility that the decreased dose could decrease the already minimal chance of adverse reactions. Use of the nanopatch may even be safe for those currently considered high risk, such as infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised.

The nanopatch also doesn’t require refrigeration. This, combined with its simple delivery system would make vaccination access in developing nations much easier, as would the significantly lower cost.

With full clinical trials set to begin in both Australia and Papua New Guinea within the next 18 months, this is certainly a medical advancement worth watching.

Are you a pro or anti-vaxxer? Would you want to try this over the traditional jab?
Suck it up, BUTTERCUP!

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Hellmark
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Post by Hellmark » Mon Apr 06, 2015 8:50 pm

I am pro vaccine and would be willing to give it a try. Big question is how long this would need to be on.

That said, any one who thinks vaccines are bad needs a serious kick in the head.

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seajayjay
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Post by seajayjay » Tue Apr 07, 2015 1:42 am

I wonder if this will come to fruition. Sure it's been invented but, can they mass produce it easily and cheaply enough?

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Hellmark
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Post by Hellmark » Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:38 pm

It seems like once they get started, it should be cheaper. I'd say the bigger hurdle is the governmental approval. FDA and the like.

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