Languages - Split from the BSG discussion thread

Completely off-topic conversational diarrhea that the rest of the internet won't let you post anywhere because it's so pointless and irrelevant to anything important.
Post Reply
User avatar
Venomous
Site Admin
Posts: 1580
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2005 6:00 pm
Location: Social Deviancy
Contact:

Languages - Split from the BSG discussion thread

Post by Venomous » Fri Jan 27, 2006 6:19 am

zoltan wrote:I disagree completely. Language is not defined in dictionaries. The term "real word" has no meaning here. The same way as in case of "frack". "Frack" is definitely English, although its use is limited. And "Aussie" is mainstream English. Any native English speaker knows its meaning.
I completely disagree with that latter statement - the word "Aussie" is, yes, extremely common among English speakers, but I do not agree that ANY native English speaker knows its meaning.

As for the rest of your statement, I don't follow you. Perhaps I don't understand the concept of languages the way you do, being that I only speak one language fluently myself. Could you elaborate on this point please? It sounds interesting, but as it stands, it makes no sense to me.
Venomous wrote:But now you've got me curious - what's the Hungarian word for "Hungarian"? And for that matter, what's the Hungarian word for "Australian"?
zoltan wrote:Magyar and Ausztrál, respecitvely.
Ahhh, so YOU'RE Magyar... I was just commenting to Ambrosia the other day, I always see this "Magyar" on DVD language selection menus, and I could never work out what country/language it was meant to be! Now I know... that's interesting.
Venomous wrote:And while you're at it, could you also please teach me how to say "You miserable piece of shit, the next time you cut in front of me I'm going to come over there and jam my fist up your ass?"? >=D I'd like to take up abusing strangers in different languages as a hobby... =)
zoltan wrote:"Te kis gennyes szarzsák, ha legközelebb meglátlak, elkaplak és begyűröm az öklöm a seggedbe." Free translation, juicy and harsh.
Ermmm... hey, while you're at it, can I trouble you for a pronounciation guide to go along with that? It looks great on the screen, but I'm going to have a hard time yelling that at passing motorists without some kind of linguistic aide... =)
zoltan wrote:Dum spiro, spero.
Uh, just a reminder - you're the only person here who speaks Magyar. Could I trouble you for a translation there buddy? =P
- Venomous -

The internet is a tool, and so are most of the people who use it...

Social Deviancy

Zoltan

Post by Zoltan » Sat Jan 28, 2006 9:37 am

Seems like a nice topic. I'll join in as soon as I am back from shopping.

Zoltan

Re: Languages - Split from the BSG discussion thread

Post by Zoltan » Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:05 pm

Venomous wrote:
zoltan wrote:I disagree completely. Language is not defined in dictionaries. The term "real word" has no meaning here. The same way as in case of "frack". "Frack" is definitely English, although its use is limited. And "Aussie" is mainstream English. Any native English speaker knows its meaning.
I completely disagree with that latter statement - the word "Aussie" is, yes, extremely common among English speakers, but I do not agree that ANY native English speaker knows its meaning.
So, is "Aussie" English or not?
Venomous wrote:As for the rest of your statement, I don't follow you. Perhaps I don't understand the concept of languages the way you do, being that I only speak one language fluently myself. Could you elaborate on this point please? It sounds interesting, but as it stands, it makes no sense to me.
Alright. I will elaborate. But first let's try to define the term "English word". What makes a word belong to the English (or any other) language? It is vital for a discussion like this. Or, rather, this may be the real question.

I am sure scholars have been debating over this for centuries but I am too lazy to look up a definition, so here's my own. A word is part of a language when at least two of its native speakers can use this word to convey message or meaning. The words of a language form an open set. While the elements of a language's grammar usualy form a closed set. So applying the closed set elements on the open set elements produces language. The use of a word may be extremely limited or even temporary as well as widespread and longlasting. The popularity or longevity of a word, however, is not a criterion of belonging to a certain language. This way both "frack" and "Aussie" are words and words of English. And I'd put "Hungies" to this category, too.
Venomous wrote:
zoltan wrote:"Te kis gennyes szarzsák, ha legközelebb meglátlak, elkaplak és begyűröm az öklöm a seggedbe." Free translation, juicy and harsh.
Ermmm... hey, while you're at it, can I trouble you for a pronounciation guide to go along with that? It looks great on the screen, but I'm going to have a hard time yelling that at passing motorists without some kind of linguistic aide... =)
Hmm, I am not at all sure it is possible, but I'll give it a try.

"Te ghen-yesh kish sar-jacques (like the French pronunciation), h-ah legh-kozelebb megh-latlak, elkaplak ai-sh beh-dyurom az oklom ah shegghedbeh."
Venomous wrote:
zoltan wrote:Dum spiro, spero.
Uh, just a reminder - you're the only person here who speaks Magyar. Could I trouble you for a translation there buddy? =P
Umm, yeah, I may be the only one on this board to speak Hungarian, but this is in Latin. :) And it means "while I breathe, I hope."

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests